Kids from low-income families use their brains differently than those from high-income families

4 years ago

It's not necessarily shocking, but it is interesting.

In a recent study of kids between ages 12 and 14, it was found that those from low-income families allocate more attention to unimportant tasks than those of their higher-income peers. 

This discrepancy in selective attention is likely due to the fact that kids who live in lower-income areas have more of a need to be aware of their surroundings. As this article puts it, they "live in environments which are more intimidating." Maybe they've become aware of neighbors arguing or the sound of gunshots or just more people coming in and out of the apartment. Also, maybe these kids are more likely to be home alone (or watching a younger sibling) - though the study didn't say whether they ruled out that factor.

Here's the piece I read:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/253330.php

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