How to Support your Family and Spouse during Job Relocations

4 years ago

Moving down the street is hard, let alone moving to a house in a completely new town, state, or country. And nowadays, relocating for a job is more popular than ever, especially with the uncertain economy. If you have a family or spouse faced with relocating for a job, here are a few tips on how to make the transition a little easier.

1.  Have a plan. The best way to support your spouse and family during a work-related move is to stay organized. Have multiple to-do lists and organize them according to your priorities. For instance, have a to-do list for your old town and your new town—include things like a “see you later party” where friends and family can come over to say goodbye, and schedule visits to new schools, playgrounds, zoos, parks, etc. for when you arrive at your new home. Don’t overschedule yourselves because you need to carve out family time. This leads me to my next point, which is…

  

2.  Communicate. It’s important to stay connected to your spouse and your children if you’re moving away from friends and family. Your spouse probably feels overwhelmed, nervous and excited—make sure you take time out of each day to sit down with him/her when they get home from work and ask how their day went. Do the same for your children, ask them questions about their new school, what they did today, etc. during dinner or while you’re putting them to bed.

  

3.  Ask for relocation assistance from your spouse’s employer. This is becoming more popular for companies to offer or at least negotiate, especially if your spouse is a highly respected employee. It’s possible for you to negotiate the company paying for movers, closing costs, realtors, and a variety of other moving necessities. Don’t hesitate to ask about these benefits! You need all the help you can get.

  

4.  Get to know your new area before you move by reading blogs, picking up books at the local library, and seeking out people that are familiar with where you’re moving. Having an understanding of the local culture will help you set realistic expectations for your life in your new home.

  

5.  Explore and take day trips. Don’t let your desire to unpack everything prevent you from exploring your new home and new town with the family. The first few weeks are the best times to visit nearby attractions like parks, zoos, fairs, surrounding towns, etc.

  

6.  Start building a new network. In order to make your new house feel like home you have to begin to build a network of friends. Think about things you and your children like to do. Are you physically active? Join a gym and attend classes, it’s a great way to meet people! If you move to a neighborhood, walk to your closest neighbors and introduce yourselves. Many people relocate during the summer— if you do, enroll your kids in a camp so they can meet other kids their age with similar interests. And don’t forget, encourage your spouse to make connections at work—not only will this make him/her feel more comfortable in the office, it’s also a great way to meet other people your age with children (so your kids can have playmates).

Moving is an emotional experience for your entire family. You can make it easier on everyone if you remain calm, think ahead, and communicate openly and honestly. Will there be bad days when you want to cry? Yep. Just know that in the end, your family will come out of this stronger—financially and emotionally. Take this precious opportunity to bond with your spouse and children, and create some fabulous memories!

 

This post is provided  by Transit Systems Inc, one of the  nation’s top long distance moving companies.

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