Digital Trustfunds

5 years ago

I recently confessed on my blog that my husband and I are extremely irresponsible with money. He was not at all pleased that I outed him to the world because, as he stated, it is inconsistent with his branding. He likes to give the impression that we have it all together. Since the name of my blog is "I Am A Mess," I'm pretty sure my inability to save a dollar is consistent with my branding, so I've decided to hide out over here on BlogHer, where I know he won't find me.

We don't have a retirement fund or even a savings account. We know there is a future but we are not planning for it. It's not that we don't want to or that we are lazy or incapable of creating a budget, it's just that we have a lot of nonnegotiable bills and nothing really carries over month to month. My husband works in the entertainment industry in a position where he could just about strike it rich over night...or not. We are living on a wing and a prayer. It is terrifying!

Since I can't put money in a college fund for my son quite yet, I've decided to create him a Digital Trust Fund because, quite frankly, it's something I can do. Have you heard about these things yet? I think they're quite cool!

Basically, a Digital Trust Fund is when you secure things like domain names, Facebook accounts, Twitter accounts and Gmail accounts for your child in their name so that when they are older they have access to them. For example, I bought my son the URL dylansirotin.com to prevent someone else named Dylan Sirotin from getting it first, and I'm going to protect it for him until he comes of age (i.e. When I decide he's old enough to have his own website or when he's thirty, whichever comes first.) As new websites become popular through the years I will continue to secure accounts in his name.

If you decide to do this for your child, here are a couple tips:

1) You need to flub about your child's birthday because most sites have minimum age requirements. I used my own birthday for all accounts to keep things simple. He can change it when he's ready to take them over.

2) Email your child (at his or her new email address!) as well as yourself instructions, usernames and passwords for all the new accounts you set up. If you can, use the same usernames and passwords on all accounts.

3) Make sure you set URLs to auto-renew so that you don't lose them!

4) Write your child an email and send it to their new email account. It's fun and weird to email your future child.

I know having a Gmail account in his name won't make Dylan's life any easier in a meaningful way, but its something he will at least appreciate down the road. And its something that I can do now. For free.

If you follow my blog you know that Dylan is very techno-savvy (see my list of top educational apps for toddlers here!) so I think he will appreciate his Digital Trust Fund. That said, I am so praying I have more to offer him by then!

 

Courtney

www.IAmAMess.com

Finding ME in the Mess.

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