Can Home Construction Projects with Children Boost Intelligence?

2 months ago
Photo Credit: Flickr
This article was written by a member of the SheKnows Community. It has not been edited, vetted or reviewed by our editorial staff, and any opinions expressed herein are the writer’s own.

The new argument in town is whether construction projects can boost the intelligence of a child. While children love being a part of any project, physically building something makes their eyes light up and can really open their minds to new and interesting things in life. It’s a creative way that you can effectively help discipline the child to think outside the box and use their brainpower to construct something new and unique.

You’ve probably heard from pediatricians, as other parents have, that brick, block and recycled material building is constructive for children to play with. These materials are creative and they can help children build their motor and spatial skills, but even further, they can also help develop their problem-solving skills. These things are beneficial, right?  

What if all that building was also doing something more for your child?

Just like having a professional contractor come to your home to add on a room addition can improve your homes appearance and give you more room to live, building blocks and small construction projects with children can help improve your child’s intelligence level and give them more abilities to use as they grow.

The Reviews

 

Thumbnail
Photo Credit: Flickr

In depth reviews have been held showing that children are developing a whole new set of special skills when they combine the use of building blocks, along with a blueprint, to create something different. Who would have thought that those jam-packed hours of clicking little blocks together with your little one was doing something extremely beneficial for them?

  

Children can choose the correct blocks, make sure they fit with one another and think quantitively to solve the problem. What we see as simple is a bit more involved to the kids. Those motors are turning in the child’s mind that we cannot see. It’s something to realize that your child might be a genius, given his four large totes of blocks and a whole lot of time on his hands.

  

During one review, three-year old children were asked to put together a design that was shown to them with other blocks. Only 40% could do so correctly. The results determined that the three-year old’s mind is not able to put the pieces together through individual steps just by viewing a completed project. However, it also showed that with more experience and practice, more children could build more complex models when they had direction on how to do so.

 

With more building time and some blueprints to follow, older children could follow directions, put together complex plans and were even able to score higher on tests for spatial ability. Children that spent more time playing with building blocks also showed that they had an interest in taking things apart, putting them together and wanting to know more about how things worked overall. Many of whom, with the right direction and encouragement, these little block builders could work hard to become engineers in the future.

  

Encourage Your Child! 

 

Thumbnail
Photo Credit: Air Force Medicine

 

It’s a great idea to encourage your children to do constructive projects as much as they can. Whether it is through blocks, bricks or other materials. The importance of working their brains to create something new and to be as creative as possible will be as important to you, as it is surely just as important to the child as they learn new skills. Skills like this are extremely beneficial for children.

  

Perhaps we should also turn our attention to sharing as many life skills as possible with our children, even from a very young age. Learning to construct with blocks and other materials, as well as developing a love for reading and books, might very well be what we need to shape very well mannered, independent and strong children for the future.

 

Tagged in:
parenting family

More from parenting

Parenting
by Lisa Hirsch Lozano | a day ago
Parenting
by Marquita Harris | 2 days ago
Parenting
by Marquita Harris | 2 days ago
Parenting
by Rosie Luik | 2 days ago
Parenting
by Allison Hope | 3 days ago
Parenting
by Christopher Luu | 3 days ago
Parenting
by Marquita Harris | 4 days ago
Parenting
by Claire Gillespie | 4 days ago
Parenting
by Sarah Caron | 5 days ago
Parenting
by Allison Hope | 5 days ago
Parenting
by Michelle Maffei | 5 days ago