Why Lineman Will Be the Hottest Career Choice In 2018

a month ago
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As big as America is, it rely solely on the power line to maintain the standard of living and keep the wheels of industry turning. This takes a lot of linemen to keep up with the maintenance, upgrades, and the repairs of the power line.

According to the US Department of Energy, more than 450,000 miles of high voltage transmission lines delivering electricity throughout the United States. This alone is enough to circle the Earth more than 12 times and that doesn’t even include the local connections within neighborhoods, cities and other communities.

As such, the lineman schools has become a most do for most people seeking for a lucrative career to venture into. As the number of NALTC students shows that, majority of the people are now applying for lineman training. NALTC stands for "North American Lineman Training Center". The company trains people on how to work on power lines.

  • Why Choose a Career in the Electrical Industries

The prospect of earning a high paying electrician salary is very attractive to many people interested in starting a new career. However, there are other important factors as well that indicate a career in the electrical field is an excellent choice.

Firstly, according to the job projections reported by the U.S. Department of Labor, states that; there were 236,600 line workers employed in the US as of 2014. Bureau of Labor Statistics asserts that the job growth rate for electricians by the year 2024 will be an estimated 23% higher than the average national job growth rate. What this mean for electricians is that, more electricians will be needed and currently employed electricians can enjoy job stability and security.

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Another reason choosing a career as an electrician is a cannot-do-without choice is because companies that employ electricians realize the current job trends and the shortage of electricians. That means if they don't want to lose their electricians to a different company, they need to keep them happy with incentives like high salaries, retirement plans medical insurance and so on.

  • How to Start Your Career as a Lineman

The path to becoming a lineman would typically begin with going to the lineman school, and undergo the lineman training program related to the electrical trade in schools like the North American Lineman Training Center (NALTC), and other similar institute that will train you to become a lineman

The individual training to become a lineman may equally participate in an apprenticeship through a local company working in partnership with a union. Apprenticeships can last for as many as four years, providing real world on the job experience and technical training in preparation for earning a journeyman license, and eventually a master electrician/lineman license.

  • What Does a Lineman Earn?

Many professionals in this trade have made their career choice partly based on the high salaries linemen workers earn. The US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that nationally, the average salary for electrical power line installers and repairers was $65,650 in 2015, while the top ten percent earned $95,990. If the past is an indication of the future, then we can also expect this number to increase. Since 2011 the national average salary for power-line installers and repairers has risen by nearly 10 percent.

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