Ten Pounds Copper Pennies $ 6

6 years ago
This article was written by a member of the SheKnows Community. It has not been edited, vetted or reviewed by our editorial staff, and any opinions expressed herein are the writer’s own.

Root vegetables, like carrots, sit in your garden all summer gathering energy and packing it away in their subterranean storage systems.

Harvesting carrots in the fall brings the goodness of spring and summer indoors as this amazing foodstuff can be stored at cool temperatures, lasting until spring.

Every family should have a garden and every garden should have carrots, unless, of course, you live near a COSTCO...

Carrots are hearty root vegetables
that are easily stored for winter.

When times are tough, or even when they're not, where can you buy ten pounds of organic food for $6.00? COSTCO, that's where, and probably other places as well, but COSTCO is amazing as they have a number of organic foods I wasn't expecting at such a large "big box" store. And ten pounds of organic food is ten pounds of organic goodness that can fill lots of tummies for quite a while.

I am talking about COSTCO's organic carrots, which are the deal of the century. You just have to like carrots and yet be aware that if you eat too many at once, you can turn orange from the carrot coloring, carotene. But, other than that, these handy root vegetables will store for quite a while as long as you take them out of their plastic bags and put them in the vegetable crisper of the refrigerator.

Slicing carrots into "Copper Pennies" begins a
side dish that will become a family treat.

 

COSTCO carrots, I found are even cheaper, in other areas of the country. While ten pounds of COSTCO Organic Carrots are between six and seven dollars outside of the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan area, the COSTCO web site shows that ordering on-line allows you to buy ten pounds of organic carrots for, if you can believe it, $ 4.99, plus some shipping and handling, I'm sure.

Overall, carrots are a great addition to any frugal household hoping to sustain life on grated carrot raisin salad, vegetable soup, carrot cake or carrot juice. Why, one could make a whole seven course meal using carrots every step of the way. This is not beginning to mention, however, the best use of all for carrots, making Copper Pennies.

Fill a saucepan with the sliced carrots and cover
with filtered water and some pinches of Real Salt. When the carrots have cooked, but are still firm
enough to hold their shape and not become mush,
pour off the water.

 

Food fantasies were big at our house when I was a kid. My dad, more than my mother, tried to make things "kid friendly" and would come up with names for things he thought we might not want to eat. It wasn't until years later that I learned the real reason he was watching out for us. He, himself, didn't like the serving choices and that's why he thought he had to make them fun for us. That's why we had "Liver Candy" for calves liver and "Baby Cabbages" for Brussels sprouts, in addition to "Copper Pennies" for cooked carrots.

Melt some grass fed organic butter in a pan with
organic brown sugar. Add carrots and stir to heat through
and coat with yummy candy-like goodness.

 

And I suppose I continued the fun food naming trend when my kids were small. There was nothing they liked more than a little bowl of frozen peas. We called them "Pea-sicles," named after Popsicle brand frozen ice confections.

We serve our Copper Pennies with sour cream,
walnuts and a sprinkle of brown sugar, all organic.

 

This making "much over nothing" to bring smiles to the face of a child is lots of fun for adults as well. Coincidentally, the art of entertaining children reminds me of a post I read this week on BlogHer: "It will be like an Amusement Park...only Better." A fanciful, creative post by BlogHer "dvorakoelling," relatively new to our BlogHer world, but already participating handily.

Much like my Dad and I making up little fantasies to tickle a kid, Dvora explains how she took kiddie playacting to new heights when she turned her local supermarket and shopping mall into a Disney World of sorts. I read enchantingly as Dvora described bringing the fun of a trip to FantasyLand to her seventeen month old daughter by using their cooperative imaginations to turn shopping carts into bumper cars and mall escalators into rides. It sounds like they had fun, and I know I did as well, as I read along with Dvora, thinking of my Dad's tricks to make everyday special. What a childhood rich in love I had with my Dad and Dvora's daughter, Em, is enjoying everyday with her Mom, today.

I got to thinking, simple games are like COSTCO carrots: both are nourishing; both cost little.

In a world of expensive clothes, plastic and trinkets, these thoughts really made me smile!

NaBloPoMo February 2012

SunbonnetSmart.com is authored by a little bird who loves to lure unsuspecting BlogHer bloggers to her web site.

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