How To Write About Your Teenagers When They Don't Want You To

2 years ago
This article was written by a member of the SheKnows Community. It has not been edited, vetted or reviewed by our editorial staff, and any opinions expressed herein are the writer’s own.

When I first started posting on my blog, Oh Boy Mom, my three boys were 8, 12 and 14 years old. They didn't seem too interested in what I wrote about and generally thought it was funny that I referred to them as my "dudes."

But then, as my two older boys entered the full-fledged, hormonal teenage years, they were suddenly embarrassed by my blog. Instead of receiving smiles of pride, I was now on the defensive, with my boys spewing feedback at me, such as, “What if one of my friends sees this?” and the more demanding, “Please delete this post NOW!”

public domain image via Pixabay

I was faced with either shutting down my blog permanently or figuring out a way to write about my boys without them wanting to steal my laptop away for good.

I have discovered that with a little creative tweaking to my posts, I can still manage to write about topics involving my teenage boys. Follow these tips, and I am fairly confident that your teenagers won’t ban you from ever writing about them again.

No photos.

I don’t care how cute or amusing you think the photo is of your child. You simply can NOT include it with your post. The only exception to this rule is if you want to show a hand or a foot or maybe the back of someone’s head. But, his or her face? Forget it.

No real names. Ever.

My boys are known as Big, Middle and Little Dude. Think of clever names to identify your kids, whether it’s Thing 1 and 2 or Hansel and Gretel. Think witness protection program.

No embarrassing stories.

This means no talking about dating or pretty much anything related to the opposite sex. And no reminiscing about potty training mishaps, either. Even if it’s a memory from the distant past, it’s still off-limits.

Make it more about you, not them.

Instead of making your child the subject of the post, use their presence as a way to reflect on you as a parent. For example, I once wrote a post about how my Big Dude was working at a summer job he disliked. However, I didn’t focus so much on his misery but instead recalled all the tedious summer jobs I had once endured. The post eventually circled back to teaching my son about staying committed to summer jobs, no matter how difficult that may be. But the majority of the piece was more about me than him.

Obtain their approval before publishing.

This is probably the most important tip of all. Let your teen read the post first. Once you get the okay (which should happen if you follow all my suggestions) then you can hit publish and not worry about the wrath of an annoyed teenager.

For those of you who still have young kids and write about their every move, beware! Those posts could come back to haunt you once your kids hit puberty. And for those of you with teenagers now, don’t delete your blogs just yet. If your kids are even more stubborn than mine and absolutely refuse to let you write about them, there’s always one more option: Fiction. Before you know it, your kids will be so jealous that you’ve decided to write about fictional teenagers that they’ll be begging you to include them in your blog again.

Good luck!

More from living

Living
by Julie Sprankles | 2 hours ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 3 days ago
Living
by Ashley Papa | 5 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 5 days ago
Living
by Kenzie Mastroe | 7 days ago
Living
by Kristine Cannon | 8 days ago
Living
by Fairygodboss | 10 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 11 days ago
Living
by Michelle Maffei | 12 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 14 days ago
Living
by Kristine Cannon | 14 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 18 days ago
Living
by Sarah Long | 19 days ago
Living
by Kristine Cannon | 20 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 20 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 20 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 22 days ago