Educational Podcasts and Vlogs – Learning On The Go

9 years ago

I have an increasing appreciation for educational podcasts and videos. I love having the ability of downloading a lecture, web seminar or literature. I wish that we were not be so busy that there only time for tweet-sized chunks of information. I’m not knocking the torrent of information.  It is just that I need more than 140 characters to truly understand a concept.

There is something wonderful about how we still need to have humans put the world into context; transmitting the story of our art, history, technology and culture. TeacherTube, iTunesU and YouTube.edu channel have extended the reach beyond the academic ivory tower.

That tower seems still kinda alabaster. I'm noticing something that concerns me. On the academic college and university podcasts, particularly the videos, I'm noticing the professor/instructor is predominantly male. Outside of academia there are women producing their own educational and instructional videos. Hmm.

Now I want to be honest. I'm making a highly subjective observation based on the faces that appear when I visit the educational video portals as well as the audio podcasts. There is a lot of new academic podcasts/video content being produced. That content ranges from crappy, fair or outstanding. Much of that content is free to access via the Internet and soon cell phones.

I am seriously appreciative that I don't have to take a pre-required class in order to learn about a new topic. I like it even better that I'm not paying $350 a credit just to audit a class.

Still, I have questions. What good is the content if it regurgitates a top down or myopic view or interpretation of the world? 

I am not saying that is happening. Nor am I saying that male professors/instructors are not being educationally inclusive in their presentations. I repeat, I am not saying that at all.

A photon, to my limited knowledge, does not have gender. But maybe research performed by a female scientist gets ignored over citing a known male source? I don't know. Maybe yes. Maybe no.

This is is my extremely clumsy way of introducing you to Dr. Kiki Sanford with a bit of Food Science. Any person who can explain physics with cornstarch and water is ok by me:

Dr. Kiki also has a blog called The Bird's Brain where she interviews science and other interesting types of folk. She comments on science in the news or media.

I don't know about you but I see this as a wide open opportunity for women to create educational content, non-profit, profit and for the greater good of humanity.   Why not?

We have the education, technology, training, skills and life experience to put it into multiple contexts. I'm sick of wasting time asking for rightful inclusion and have it thrown back in my faces as unnecessary or an accommodation to political correctness. I'm on the planet and I require educational representation.

Let's just do it and create world class education systems, because like panty hose one size does not fit all. (End of mini-rant.)

What would it take to build a network of women centered educational resources? I think we have the beginning tools at our fingers tips as we speak.  I’m impatient.

I'll put it on the list of things to do. In the meantime, let me give you some examples of folks also looking at educational content or producing stuff you might like to learn.

Dara at The Do It Yourself Scholar is my girl. She has got list of courses, areas of study and links to everything from philosophy, lectures and any open or free university podcasts she can find.  I can’t link to iTunesU but Dara has a page of educational podcasts you should check out when you open iTunes. Dara’s blog is absolutely in my RSS collection.

This is to make amends to my French teacher. That poor woman suffered with me (and 34 other kids) in her class. Katia and Kylemac are two women who love the French language. So much so that they wanted to share that love with others and give insight on living the expat life. They do have French lessons in the archives, they also have travel tips and the latest content includes their adventures in France. These are really good friends. Maybe the best thing you could do is just allow them to ramble and let them paint word pictures, in English and French, in your mind.

Mary Burkey is a book audiophile originally posted at Audiobooker on Blogspot but now posts at the American Library Associations Booklists On Line. Mary is a teacher and librarian. In addition to finding really good stuff to read she also shares with you info on different topics. Such as how to listen with a critical ear. In her post Mary has a list of resources you can use to check out pronunciations for yourself or to test the quality of the recording.

I really appreciate this list. It has happened to me that although I’ve known what a word meant I had never heard it pronounced, such as cache (computer term).  Yes, I pronounced it like the perfume in front of a bunch of Techies. Male Techies. One of the many reasons why I am so passionate about education, helps to avoid really embarrassing situations.

Ok, last one I want to leave you with is Edubeacon.com, this is like everybody into the pool, all  are welcomed. From gaming for education, social media in schools, new teaching approaches and more.

Ok, you’ll excuse me. Have to find the podcast I’m going to bed with tonight.

Gena Haskett is a Contributing Editor, she blogs at Out On The Stoop and PCCLibtech.

More from living

Living
by Kristen Fischer | 21 hours ago
Living
by Fairygodboss | 2 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 3 days ago
Living
by Julie Sprankles | 4 days ago
Living
by Fairygodboss | 4 days ago
Living
by Justina Huddleston | 7 days ago
Living
by SheKnows Editors | 10 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 10 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 12 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 14 days ago
Living
by Ashley Papa | 14 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 14 days ago
Living
by Kristen Fischer | 15 days ago
Living
by Colleen Stinchcombe | 19 days ago