The Big 7: Packaging

3 months ago
 
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Can you recall what it was like when you purchased your first smart phone? Removing the seal on the packaging and feeling the box? Just from touching these boxes you could tell how much work and dedication had been poured into this device. Later, it was revealed to you that the company which created this device designed their packaging to invoke these feelings within the buyer. 

Packaging plays a significant role in how buyers perceive value. With a vast amount of packaging choices to choose from, it can be an overwhelming decision for which packaging suits the needs of your product best. Here are ten different forms of packaging that can give your product a professional look.

1. Paperboard boxes

 
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Paperboard is a thin, lightweight material that maintains a level of strength. Its shape can be easily changed by either folding or cutting to fit a desired shape. It’s these traits that make it ideal for personal packaging. Paperboard is made by processing pulp made from recycled paper or wood and then whitening it with a bleaching process. Paperboard comes in different grades, which offer different strengths.

2. Cardboard

 
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Cardboard, otherwise known as corrugated boxes are commonly used for large shipments and packaging for smaller items. Cardboard comes in various grades and types depending on the strength and durability the packaging requires. You can identity corrugated material easily through its corrugated medium, or fluting. Corrugated material is composed of an outside and inside liner, three layers of paper and the corrugated medium which provides the cardboard with strength and stability.

3. Plastic boxes

 
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Plastic is a very versatile material that has been used by every aeronautics organizations to office suppliers. Many items have been replaced by their plastic counterparts because of its wide range of use and practicality. Plastic is a very flexible material that also offers a lightweight design. An added bonus of plastic is its transparent qualities, allowing one to view inside without ever opening the package. Plastic is also able to be applied as a film to enhance the shine and professionalism of a product or package.

4. Rigid boxes

 
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Have you ever wondered what the box packaging luxury items are made of? It’s easy to believe its just a stronger cardboard type with a refined appearance. This durable and professional packaging is called a rigid box. Rigid boxes are made out of condensed paperboard that is thicker than paperboard by four times. One example of a rigid box is the packaging that holds high end cell phones and tablets.. Rigid boxes are the more expensive package types. Most rigid boxes are hand-made and have no collapsible features. This makes rigid boxes larger which adds to shipping fees. 

5. Chipboard boxes

 
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Chipboards are a type of paperboard that is made from reclaimed paper stock. Because it can be easily formed to suit your needs, it is an inexpensive way to package your products. With various strength levels determined by density, the material can be treated with chemicals to provide even more durability. Chipboard is not ideal for heavy items as chipboard is lightweight in design. Chipboard is intended for smaller, lighter items like cereal and tissue boxes. 

6. Poly bags

 
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Poly Bags are small plastic bags made of a thin flexible film. It is very common in packaging items and is used for various items from foods to chemicals. Poly bags offer a durable design that is light but also reusable. Because of their simple design, poly bags are very customizable in terms of size and design. 

7. Foil sealed bags

 
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Foiled seal bags are used for coffee and tea packaging to maintain product flavor. It protects the product from bacteria and helps increase shelf life. The fabric is air tight and helps prevent the growth of bacteria.

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