6 Important Things You Must Know Before and After Installing a Mailbox

a year ago
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Mailboxes have been a crucial part of the American household system for the past couple of centuries, and even though development in science and technology have made E-mail a common thing, the conventional post mail still has its own charm. So much so that when people move into a new house, getting a new mailbox for the house is definitely one of the boxes they want to check. But getting a new mailbox isn’t as simple as it might seem as you have to consider a lot of things to opt for the best mailbox available. The colour, the size, the style, the pattern, everything regarding a mailbox matters when it comes to making a choice, but that’s not all. But don’t worry, because even though we may have made it sound like it’s a daunting task, we’re here to help you in this endeavor, and to do just that, we’re going to tell you about the 6 most important things you must know before and after installing a mailbox at your place, so let’s begin.

Checking up with the underground utilities:

If you have bought your mailbox and are about to dig in to install in the ground, wait, dial 811. WHY? If you dial this number, you will get in touch with your state’s call centre, who will, in turn, connect you with your utility company. But why do you need to do this? Because most utility cables and pipelines are installed beneath the surface of the house, and when you think about digging the ground to install your mailbox, you have to try and avoid these cables and pipelines, otherwise, you will harm them and add more problems instead of solving them. The best thing to do in such situations is to get in touch with your utility company and have them guide you throughout the entire process.

Getting in touch with the postmaster:

Before you start digging in order to mount or install your mailbox, depending upon the type of mailbox you have, it is of paramount importance that you contact the postmaster of your locality. Installing a mailbox isn’t only about digging a hole, putting the mailbox’s base in the ground, and putting concrete over it, it is also about adhering to the local regulations about installing a new mailbox. The height of the mailbox from the perspective of the postman, the height of the mailbox from the perspective of the homeowner, and a lot of other things, they all come under the umbrella of things that a postmaster is responsible for maintaining and overseeing.

Get a house number plaque:

Getting a clearly visible house number plaque for your new mailbox is essential to make it easier for the postman to deliver your mail. By doing this, you can also avoid getting your mail mis-delivered or get someone else’s mail delivered to you. You can head over to MailboxWorks.com and look for the best plaques for your mailbox.

Protecting the mailbox from weather conditions:

Now that you have installed your mailbox, it is important to protect it from rain, snow, or even hail. To do this, you can either install a little metal shelter over the mailbox or if that’s not your thing, you can also use hardened materials in the mailbox that doesn’t get affected by rain and other weather conditions.

Security of the mailbox:

After installing the mailbox, you won’t stand in the window and monitor it all day for thieves and mail-stealers. But securing the post is still imperative, so what do you do? You install a firm and safe lock on the mailbox to prevent unauthorized access. Of course, the postman will be able to drop the mail, but nobody will be able to retrieve that mail without opening the lock.

Go for easy retrieval:

Be it a floor installed mailbox or a wall mounted one, you shouldn’t get yourself wet in the rain or covered with snow in the cold in order to retrieve your mail. Best solution? Install your mailbox in such a way that you don’t have to go outside to pick the mail.

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