When Bipolar Disorder Wrecks Your Sex Life

6 months ago
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I had a hot sex dream last night. That's fortunate, as it's the only hot sex likely for me these days. I have bipolar disorder 2 and tend toward the depressed.

I have only once experienced the hypomanic rush that leads one to the desire for uninhibited, crazy, insistent, steamy motel sex. So I can't really tell you much about that, except to make sure it's safe sex, even if it is spontaneous, wild, and compelling. Coping with the aftermath is also something I can't help with.

So. Bipolar depression and sex. (I am writing from the point of view of a cis-gender heterosexual female, so YMMV.)

It will likely come as no surprise to you to learn that bipolar disorder has an effect on your sex life. And, aside from mania, that effect is to lessen or completely kill it. And there are varying levels: low libido, lack of desire, difficulty ejaculating, etc. The question is what to do about it. Here are some examples of advice:

[S]ex is a part of life and it’s a part you don’t want, or need, to hang up just because you have a mental illness...There are therapeutic techniques that can deal with hypersexuality or low sex drive, and, of course, there are always medical options as well.

http://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/breakingbipolar/2013/01/normal-sex-bi…

And this:

Getting bipolar disorder under control is the first step to improving your sex life. It’s easier to address these issues when your moods are stable. Many people with bipolar disorder have healthy relationships and satisfying sex lives. The key is working with your doctor to find the right treatment and talking with your partner about any sexual issues.

http://www.healthline.com/health/bipolar-disorder/sexual-health#outlook5

And that's all well and wonderful, but how much does it actually help?

Not that I'm an expert, but here's what I can say about the subject.

Realize that most of sex happens in the brain. The body goes along for the ride. If you're bipolar, you're already having trouble with your brain. It makes sense that you'd have trouble with sex too. Don't beat yourself up. It can be a nuisance or a sorrow or a loss, but it doesn't have to be a tragedy.

Decide how much sex you actually need in your life. Some people have naturally low sex drives and are quite satisfied with long gaps between sexual encounters or occasional masturbation. If this is the case for you, dandy. The real problem comes when you and your partner(s) have a mismatch in your sex drive. That's where the talking comes in.

Ask for what you need and encourage your partner to do the same. And accept and/or give what you can. If you need a hug or a cuddle, ask for it. If your partner asks for one, give it. Don't push for more right then. Even if you have no desire for "the act" yourself, you may be able to give your partner some of what she/he needs. Or vice versa. Of course, if you're at the very depths, you may not even be able to ask for a hug. But if one is offered, don't turn it down. Keeping that bond going may improve your connection when the depression has eased.

You can try different medications or see an endocrinologist, but don't expect quick results. Or any, necessarily. The one drug that peps up your libido may also be the one that gives you side effects you can't handle. And after years of trying different combinations of pills, you may decide, like I did, that having a reasonably functioning brain is more important to you than having regular sex. In other words, you may face a trade-off.

Listen to your body as well as your brain. I already know that my brain is not performing up to specs. Occasionally, when I'm reading a book or watching a movie or remembering a dream or thinking about an old friend, I feel something that reminds me of what it is to feel desire. If that happens, enjoy and encourage it. It's a signal that you may not be totally numb from the neck down.

I could tell you that everything will be okay and you'll soon be back to romping between the sheets with wild abandon. I haven't seen statistics on it, but it seems unlikely. If you want to get your sex life started again, you're going to have to work at it, just like you work at taming your bipolar disorder.

I had a hot sex dream last night. That's fortunate, as it's the only hot sex likely for me these days. I have bipolar disorder 2 and tend toward the depressed.

I have only once experienced the hypomanic rush that leads one to the desire for uninhibited, crazy, insistent, steamy motel sex. So I can't really tell you much about that, except to make sure it's safe sex, even if it is spontaneous, wild, and compelling. Coping with the aftermath is also something I can't help with.

So. Bipolar depression and sex. (I am writing from the point of view of a cis-gender heterosexual female, so YMMV.)

It will likely come as no surprise to you to learn that bipolar disorder has an effect on your sex life. And, aside from mania, that effect is to lessen or completely kill it. And there are varying levels: low libido, lack of desire, difficulty ejaculating, etc. The question is what to do about it. Here are some examples of advice:

[S]ex is a part of life and it’s a part you don’t want, or need, to hang up just because you have a mental illness...There are therapeutic techniques that can deal with hypersexuality or low sex drive, and, of course, there are always medical options as well.

http://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/breakingbipolar/2013/01/normal-sex-bi…

And this:

Getting bipolar disorder under control is the first step to improving your sex life. It’s easier to address these issues when your moods are stable. Many people with bipolar disorder have healthy relationships and satisfying sex lives. The key is working with your doctor to find the right treatment and talking with your partner about any sexual issues.

http://www.healthline.com/health/bipolar-disorder/sexual-health#outlook5

And that's all well and wonderful, but how much does it actually help?

Not that I'm an expert, but here's what I can say about the subject.

Realize that most of sex happens in the brain. The body goes along for the ride. If you're bipolar, you're already having trouble with your brain. It makes sense that you'd have trouble with sex too. Don't beat yourself up. It can be a nuisance or a sorrow or a loss, but it doesn't have to be a tragedy.

Decide how much sex you actually need in your life. Some people have naturally low sex drives and are quite satisfied with long gaps between sexual encounters or occasional masturbation. If this is the case for you, dandy. The real problem comes when you and your partner(s) have a mismatch in your sex drive. That's where the talking comes in.

Ask for what you need and encourage your partner to do the same. And accept and/or give what you can. If you need a hug or a cuddle, ask for it. If your partner asks for one, give it. Don't push for more right then. Even if you have no desire for "the act" yourself, you may be able to give your partner some of what she/he needs. Or vice versa. Of course, if you're at the very depths, you may not even be able to ask for a hug. But if one is offered, don't turn it down. Keeping that bond going may improve your connection when the depression has eased.

You can try different medications or see an endocrinologist, but don't expect quick results. Or any, necessarily. The one drug that peps up your libido may also be the one that gives you side effects you can't handle. And after years of trying different combinations of pills, you may decide, like I did, that having a reasonably functioning brain is more important to you than having regular sex. In other words, you may face a trade-off.

Listen to your body as well as your brain. I already know that my brain is not performing up to specs. Occasionally, when I'm reading a book or watching a movie or remembering a dream or thinking about an old friend, I feel something that reminds me of what it is to feel desire. If that happens, enjoy and encourage it. It's a signal that you may not be totally numb from the neck down.

I could tell you that everything will be okay and you'll soon be back to romping between the sheets with wild abandon. I haven't seen statistics on it, but it seems unlikely. If you want to get your sex life started again, you're going to have to work at it, just like you work at taming your bipolar disorder.

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