Breast Cancer Awareness

4 years ago
This article was written by a member of the SheKnows Community. It has not been edited, vetted or reviewed by our editorial staff, and any opinions expressed herein are the writer’s own.

My mother is the reason for this blog. We are two year survivors! My mother is just a common person with common problems and an average life. To say she is no one special would not be correct, she is special to all her family members and I love her like a daughter should. She was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago. The news was devestating and we can now appreciate the word CANCER and what it means. The journey through her healing was long and very dramatic and full of unknowns. Everyday was a challenge and we learned a great deal along the way. Each treatment came with it's own set backs and with each side effect came more healing time. It took a very long year before mom was back to a healthy women and standing on her own two feet. She is able to live, now on her own and lives to tell another story. 

In my opinion, breast cancer is out of control and I went on a mission for information. My biggest question was "Why and how do we grow cancer". The internet is full of answers and let me say this, it opened my eyes! There are so many factors, and some of the things I discovered really stood apart from the others. Now, I would like to share some of my findings with all of you. 

www.twobreastwishes.com

It's all about early detection and prevention!

Women age 40 and older should have a mammogram every year and should continue to do so for as long as they are in good health.

Women in their 20s and 30s should have a clinical breast exam (CBE) as part of a periodic (regular) health exam by a health professional preferably every 3 years. Starting at age 40, women should have a CBE by a health professional every year.

Breast self-exam (BSE) is an option for women starting in their 20s. Women should be told about the benefits and limitations of BSE. Women should report any breast changes to their health professional right away. For self-exams, please watch the you tube video to the right top corner of the page.

Women who are at high risk for breast cancer based on certain factors should get an MRI and a mammogram every year.

Prevention with diet:

Take the ten step challenge to help reduce the chances of any cancers.

  1. Maintain a healthy body weight (bmi) body mass index. Weight gain in midlife has shown to greatly increase the risk of cancer.
  2. Minimize or avoid alcohol. The Harvards Nurses Study and several other has shown the consumption of one or more alcohol beverages a day will increase the risk of cancer. It’s best to avoid alcohol altogether. Folate is a vitamin that cells in the body need to stay healthy. Alcohol use may lower the body’s ability to absorb folate from foods. This problem can be compounded in heavy drinkers, who often do not get enough nutrients such as folate in their diet. Low folate levels may play a role in the risk of breast and colorectal cancers.
  3. Consume as many fruits and vegetables as possible. Antioxidants, or anti-oxidation agents, reduce the effect of dangerous oxidants by binding together with these harmful molecules, decreasing their destructive power.  Antioxidants can also help repair damage already sustained by cells. Just by adding these foods to your diet will not only fight cancer cells but you will have more energy. The following is list of foods that should be taken into your diet on a daily basis, such as berries, nuts, mushrooms, broccoli, carrots, pumpkin, red peppers, spinach, sweet potatoes and tomatoes. All the mentioned foods are rich in antioxidants and beta-carotene in which promotes healthy blood cells.
  4. Exercise regularly. Exercising everyday has powerful protection against cancer. Aim for 30 minutes and remember it is about consistency and duration not intensity.
  5. Stop bad fat intake. Stay away from omega-6 fats such as sunflower, corn and cottonseed oils, however incorporate monounsaturated oils such as canola, olive oil and avocados.
  6. Eat the right carbs. Stay away from foods like white flour, white rice and sugar. These food trigger hormonal changes that promote cellular growth in breast tissue. Replace these foods with high fiber foods such as beans, and whole grains.
  7. Minimize the in take of estrogens. Lifetime exposure to estrogens plays a huge rule in the development of breast cancer. Avoid harmful pollutants such as pesticides and industrial chemicals. Secondly, wash all non-organic produce before consuming them. Thirdly, minimize exposure to residual hormones found in non-organic dairy products, meat and poultry.
  8. Take vitamin C daily. Consult your doctor on the your recommended dosage or to find out if it is recommended for you.
  9. Minimize your red meat intake as well as some dairy. The bi-products, drugs and hormones that given to the animals before they are killed are very dangerous during consumption. Another words you are eating whatever that animal just eat.
  10. Maintain good sleeping habits. It speaks for itself. Get 7-8 hours of sleep per night. We are living in stressful times and sleep depravation  is running ramped. I recommend doing your homework and educate  yourself on how to maintain a healthy sleep pattern.

That's just a small piece of the pie. Look for more blog's for information on How to win the fight against breast cancer or visit www.twobreastwishes.com

 

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