My Crisper: Where Good Vegetables Go To Die

5 years ago

Apparently I am running some sort of subsidy program for the Vegetable Farmers of America. Each week I buy crisp, vibrant produce while visions of soup, stir fry and salad dance in my head. Yet three weeks later these once nutrient laden powerhouses lie limp, bruised and rotting in the bottom of my fridge. The promise of nourishing meals having been erased by the realities of busy schedules, bad habits and picky palates.


Now here is where I should be offering inspirational ideas on how to change this travesty, but at the moment I don't have any. This is actually a huge problem in my house, one that I'm moving to the forefront of my health battle.

I CAN tell you what my new plan of attack is for this situation. An acquaintance of mine is a certified health coach and hard core vegan. Who better to teach me how to use all those lovely green orbs than someone who only eats plants? So I've scheduled a meeting with her. I've also attended her free cooking classes at our local health food market. Honestly, the first class I was terrified of actually tasting the samples. I wanted to attend because her first recipe featured kale—something that is so unbelievably good for you, but it looks terrifyingly tough and bitter. As I put the kale on my fork I was like a little kid—wrinkling my nose and already planning how I could sneak the rest of my plate into the garbage without getting caught. To my surprise I honestly really liked it. I'm not saying it will become my go-to side dish, but I ate the entire portion and truly enjoyed it.

If you're interested in testing the waters of the nutritional powerhouse of kale, but are wary of its reputation, my coach turned me on to the magic of kale chips. They give the illusion of eating potato chips, and are typically covered in a delectable cashew coating. This sounds like a sneaky way to get my tastebuds used to a new flavor and they are on my shopping list for this week.

So at the moment my plan to change my vegetable-murdering ways consists of getting new ideas from a knowledgeable source, attending free classes to taste test professionally made samples, and looking for the simplest ways to start making vegetables a habit instead of a stress-inducing chore. I'll be sure to report back on my progress and I'd love to hear how you manage to seamlessly incorporate vegetables into your life.

A Su Salud! (To your health!)

Kay

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