It's the Little Things That Matter: How Artists Find the Flow

10 years ago

Blogs offer artists the opportunity to reveal to a community of readers the personal side of life as a creative person. Most artists I know are in a constant state of flux. We have to find a way to balance the everyday needs of home and family while feeding the well of inspiration. Since most of us don't have the luxury of too much time to ourselves with our myriad of responsibilities, this means it's imperative to use everyday experiences as a source of creative stimulation. The tiniest things become cause for observation, examination and reflection. Nothing is too mundane to inspire or too commonplace to become the focus of our next creative project.

No wonder this kind of slowing down and focusing transforms art into a spiritual practice for some. The art of staying in the moment becomes a way to fuel the creative fires as well as nurture the soul. A well-fed soul becomes fertile ground for the imagination and so the cycle begins again. Maybe this is why the My Sacred Life Project has become such a hit with artists across the web. If there's any group of women convinced that they need to stop and take notice, it is the reflective artist.

Started originally by Carla Blazek of Zena Musings, My Sacred Life was a thirty-day project focused on paying attention and giving simple gifts their due. The project grew to a once a week practice, where anyone and everyone received an open invitation to reflect on everything sacred about the everyday life. I've been particularly moved by the artists who've chosen to participate. Check out illustrator Penelope Dullaghan's lovely post where she collects random good bits of everyday life like fall leaves.

While the My Sacred Life community is slowing down as a way of filling up, a whole other circle of art-bloggers is speeding up in hopes of keeping the creative juices flowing. Art Everyday is the artists' version of NaBloPoMo. Instead of writing your heart out for thirty days in a row, artists are making something and posting an image online. A sure fire way to stop perfectionism right in her tracks, Art Everyday makes sure you keep throwing things out there no matter what. What's interesting is how this project is equally effective as a tool for observation and reflection. With thirty days ahead of you and lots of incentive to post, nothing is "small" anymore; every tiny project takes on a new meaning.

You won't want to miss founder of Art Everyday, Leah Piken and her lovely image Traveling Girl. You can see more of Leah's work at Blue Tree Art Gallery.

What's keeping your creative flow going this week?

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