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The sunscreen you can drink

Kristen Fischer is a writer living at the Jersey Shore. In addition to writing for SheKnows, she has penned articles for Prevention, Health, Woman's Day, BELLA, and New Jersey Monthly. Kristen enjoys spending time with her family, friend...

Sun protection without lotion?

A new drinkable sunscreen promises to offer complete sun protection.

Woman at beach

Photo credit: ONOKY - Fabrice LEROUGE/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

Putting on sunscreen is so 2013. This year, you can drink your way to sun protection.

Osmosis Skincare’s new Harmonized H2O UV Neutralizer is a drinkable sunscreen. According to the company, it cancels out 97 percent of UVA and UVB rays once ingested. That’s 30 times better sun protection than not wearing anything at all.

Harmonized H2O UV Neutralizer

At $30 for a 100 milliliter bottle, users take two milliliters every four hours while in the sun. The company advises taking that with at least two ounces of water. You’re supposed to wait an hour before actually going into the sun initially. Then you can take a second dose if you’re still in the sun three hours after the first dose.

The product has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Dr. Ben Johnson, who founded the company, said the product’s efficacy can depend on the user’s weight. Eating and exercising can also have an effect on the product.

"The higher your heart rate gets, the less this product will work," he said.

So will you see it next to Coppertone or Banana Boat products any time soon?

"Of course this stuff isn’t flying off of the shelves," Johnson said. "But we have thousands of people who have used this product and are completely satisfied. I even use this and so does my family."

News of the product has sparked some outrage.

Susan Stuart, M.D., a dermatologist from California, said the product has not been tested or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The American Academy of Dermatology has not endorsed the product.

"There is no scientific evidence that consuming products claiming to have SPF ingredients has any protective effect against the harmful UVA and UVB rays of the sun," she said. " Sunscreens have stood the test of time and rigorous clinical studies and represent the gold standard in sun protection. All other products must meet these standards or be dismissed as hype and marketing ploys which are designed to prey upon the unsuspecting public."

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